Courses and Timetable 2017-2018

Fall Term (September 11 – December 1, 2017)

Course

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Location

PSY1000HF

Directed Studies (MA)

 

 

 

 

PSY2001HF

Design of Experiments I: General Linear Model

Cunningham

Tue 

10-1

OISE2279

PSY2002HF

Design of Experiments II:  Advanced Statistical Methods for Interpersonal Perception Research

 

Carlson

Tue 

11-2

SS560A

PSY5110HF

Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience I: Rhythms of the Brain in Cognition and Pathologies

 

Takehara

Thu

1:30-3:30

SS560A

PSY5112HF

Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience III: Behavioural Epigenetics

 

Zovkic

Thu

11-1

SS4004

PSY5201HF

Audition: Cognitive Hearing Science of Communication and Aging

Pichora-Fuller

Mon

3-5

SS4004

PSY5203HF

Higher Cognition: Cognitive Neuroscience 

Moscovitch

Wed

9:30-12

SS560S

PSY5205HF

Memory: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory

Barense

Tue

2-4 

SS560A 

PSY5220HF

Advanced Topics in Cognition I: Cognitive Control as a Double-Edged Sword

Hasher

Wed 

1:30-3:30

SS560A

PSY5304HF

Language Development

Johnson

Tue

4-6

SS560A

PSY5310HF

Advanced Topics in Development I: Social-Emotional Development

Malti  

Mon

4-6

UTM DH4005

 

Spring Term (January 8 – April 5, 2018)  

Course

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Location

PSY3001HS

Professional Psychology: Research Ethics and Survival Skills

Erb

Thu

2-4

SS560A

PSY5111HS

Advanced Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience II: Opto- and Chemogenetic Neuron - Applications for Understanding Animal Behaviours

Kim       

Mon

2-4

SS560A

PSY5210HS

Advanced Topics in Perception I: Multisensory Integration

Campos

Wed

2-4 

SS560A

PSY5212HS

Advanced Topics in Perception III: Functional MRI of the Human Visual System

Bernhardt-
Walther 

Wed 

10-12 

SS560 

PSY5303HS

Cognitive Development: Probabilistic Models of Cognition

Buchsbaum, D. 

Thu 

10:30-12:30 

SS560A 

PSY5311HS

Advanced Topics in Development II:  
Perceptual/Cognitive and Motor Development

 

Schmuckler

 Mon

7-9            

SS560A 

PSY5402HS 

Personality: Fundamentals in Personality Psychology

Fournier

Tue 

12-2 

SS560A 

PSY5403HS

Social Cognition: Decision Making - Computational and Neural Approaches

Hutcherson

Tue

10-12 

SS560A 

Reading week: February 19-23

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FALL TERM (September 11 to December 1, 2017)

PSY1000HF Directed Studies   Instructors: Faculty 
Under the direction of a two-person committee, students in the M.A. year will (a) complete a programme of prescribed reading in their general area of specialization (b) prepare a major paper, which will include a proposal for M.A. thesis research (c) defend the paper to the satisfaction of the two-person committee.
PSY2001HF Design of Experiments I: General Linear Model    Instructor: Cunningham
This course is designed to introduce the student to the General Linear Model and two of its most common expression: Analysis of Variance and Multiple Regression. Additionally, student we be asked to familiarize themselves with some of the current theoretical issues in realm of data analysis itself, e.g., the value of testing the null hypothesis.

PSY2002HF Design of Experiments II    Instructor: Carlson
This course is designed to introduce you to advanced statistical tools used in personality and interpersonal perception research. You will learn how to use multilevel modeling (MLM) to index the accuracy and bias of perceptions in a variety of social contexts including dyads (e.g., romantic partners), groups (e.g., friends), and one-with-many designs (e.g., a supervisor and subordinates). This discussion will include how to use the Actor Partner Independence Model (APIM) to index perceptions among dyads and the Social Relations Model (SRM) to index perceptions in groups. You will also learn how to use response surface analysis (RSA) to index if and how accuracy and bias matter. Finally, we will use structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore issues related to measurement of perceptions. For example, you will learn how to use multi-method assessment (e.g., self- and peer-reports) to improve the validity of individual difference measures. The course will involve weekly readings, lab assignments in R, and a final project implementing the tools learned in class.  While the course will focus on interpersonal perception, we will also discuss how these statistical tools can be applied to other areas of psychology.

PSY5110HF Rhythms of the Brain inCognition and Pathologies   Instructor: Takehara
The brain generates rhythms in many frequencydomains from neurons firing hundreds of times per second to monthlyneuro-endocrine cycles.  Synchronization of these rhythms allows forfunctional connections between brain regions and is associated with manycognitive processes, including memory, perception, and action-selection.These same brain rhythms show abnormal patterns in certain psychiatricdisorders.  This course will discuss selected topics on the link betweenbrain rhythms and cognition by surveying studies that use methodologies rangingfrom single-unit recordings in animal models to magnetoencephalography studiesin humans.  The goal of this course is to provide a theoretical andexperimental framework for studying physiological mechanisms that underliecognitive functions and mental disorders.

PSY5112HF Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience III: Behavioural Epigenetics   Instructor: Zovkic
Epigenetics encompasses the study of stable alterations in gene activity that occur independent of changes to genetic sequence. Epigenetics has been implicated inall aspects of behaviour, from responding to maternal behaviour in early lifeto mediating cognitive function in aging and dementia. This course will describe how epigenetic mechanisms shape development, learning, memory, stress response, and mental illness in animal models.

PSY5201HF Audition: Cognitive Hearing Science of Communication and Aging Instructor: Pichora-Fuller
Cognitive Hearing Science is an emerging field of interdisciplinary research concerning the interactions between hearing and cognition, especially as these domains relate to human communication in spoken language or music. It follows a trend over the last half century for interdisciplinary fields to develop, including Neuroscience, then Cognitive Science, then Cognitive Neuroscience, and then Cognitive Vision Science.  A common theme is that an interdisciplinary approach is necessary to understand complex human behaviours, to develop technologies incorporating knowledge of these behaviours, and to find solutions for individuals with impairments that undermine typical behaviours. Cognitive Hearing Science is illustrated in research on five general topics: 1. the effects of reduced auditory input on communication; 2. attention and communication in complex scenes and adverse ecologies; 3. communication technologies and interventions to boost performance; 4. relationships between auditory perception, visual perception, and motor production of communication behaviours; 5. changes in performance and brain organization with development,aging, and rehabilitative training of communication behaviours. The course will use the specific topics of interest to the students to explore how basic and translational research a reshaping theory and practice in this new field.his course will cover the recent use of network analysis to understand brain function and cognition. We will discuss topics such as how to define a brain network, functional connectivity within and between the most commonly studied networks (e.g. the default network), and how network activity underlies cognitive processes such as memory and cognitive control. Applications of network analysis to lifespan experiments and to neurological and psychiatric disorders will also be covered.

PSY5203HF Cognitive Neuroscience   Instructor: Moscovitch 
The core course in cognitive neuroscience will cover a variety of functions, including memory,attention, face and object-recognition, spatial cognition, language, emotion and consciousness, as well as touch on topics in social cognition such as theoryof mind, decision making and empathy. Evidence for the involvement of specific brain areas in these functions from human lesion and neuroimaging studies willbe addressed. A brief overview of brain anatomy and neuroimaging techniques will be included.

PSY5205HF The Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory   Instructor: Barense
In this course we will consider prominenttheories regarding the nature of memory and how the remarkable feat of memoryis enabled by the brain. We will survey current research in the field, focusingon controversial areas of inquiry. The goal of this approach is to provideinsight into how details of experimental design can influence how theoreticalmodels are developed. Students will generate their own hypotheses about theorganization of memory and design experiments to test these hypotheses.

PSY5220HF Cognitive Control as a Double-Edged Sword   Instructor: Hasher
This course will consider the notion ofcognitive control, a term that has come into wide-spread use as an explanatorymechanism, most often suggesting that good control results in good cognition,including better attention, more effective learning, larger working memorycapacity and more accurate long term memory. There is also a substantialneuroimaging literature on control.  There are also notable cases in the literature which report that poorcontrol can actually result in better performance on a range of tasks.  These papers come from the child developmentand aging literatures.  In addition totrying to define cognitive control, we will read papers from the child, youngadult and aging literatures showing the strengths and weaknesses of good‘control’.

PSY5304HF Language Development   Instructor: Johnson
This graduate seminar willsurvey recent findings in language development. Discussions will befocused primarily on early language acquisition in typically developingchildren, but some discussion of special populations will be included.Sample topics to be explored include phonological development, multilingualism,word learning, social cognition, sociolinguistics, sensitive periods forlanguage acquisition, comparative communication, and relating speechperception to speech production. We will also discuss the merits and drawbacks of different methodologies used in language acquisition studies (e.g., eye tracking, EEG, corpus studies, etc.). These topics may be slightly adjusted to best reflect students'interests. Students with diverse academic backgrounds are invited to enrol.

PSY5310HF Social-Emotional Development   Instructor: Malti
This course provides an overview of current issues and trends in social-emotional development.Social-emotional development includes the ability to identify and understand one’s own feelings, to accurately read and comprehend emotional states in others, to regulate emotions and their expression in an appropriate manner, to develop empathy for others, and to establish and maintain close relationships.We will discuss various theories on social-emotional development and significant empirical research on social-emotional development from infancy to adolescence.  We will examine the role of emotions in healthy development,and explore practices to enhance social-emotional development. Lastly, we will highlight controversial issues that have long dominated scholarly discussions in the field of social-emotional development research.

 

SPRING TERM (January 8 to April 5, 2018)

PSY3001HS Professional Psychology: Research Ethics and Survival Skills   Instructor: Erb
This course will deal with issues surrounding ethical conduct in research, intellectual property, ethical treatment of data, identifying and dealing with scientific misconduct. In addition, we will discuss how to prepare effective presentations, how to apply for scholarships, postdoctoral positions and/or jobs (academic and non-academic). These are all skills which will help you in writing your PhD proposal. Members of the Department with expertise in particular areas (e.g., journal editors, members of granting councils, people fresh from the job market) will contribute. Primary requirements are participating in class discussions and completing occasional short written pieces on the required readings.

PSY5111HS Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience II: Opto- and Chemogenetic Neuron Manipulation - Applications for Understanding Animal Behaviours   Instructor: Kim
This course will involve a critical review of current research into the neurobiological substrates of mental health disorders, focusing particularly on the validity of preclinical (animal) models. We will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the underlying psycho- and neuropathologies of diseases ranging from addiction, mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, to autism. A principal goal of the course throughout will also be to examine the notion that many of the disorders share common neuropathologies, and involve dysfunction of the neurotransmitter systems/neural circuits underlying reward and punishment processing. Course evaluation will be based on a class presentation, class participation throughout the semester and a final paper.

PSY5210HS Advanced Topics in Perception I: Multisensory Integration   Instructor: Campos
Historically, perceptual research has focused on studying individual sensory modalities (vision, audition, proprioception, vestibular inputs) in isolation. However, more recent investigations have begun to consider how these sensory inputs are integrated in the brain. In this course we will review the basic tenets of multisensory integration and review supporting empirical research using physiological, psychophysical/behavioural, and computational modelling techniques. We will also consider how multisensory integration changes throughout development and aging and how it may be affected by sensory loss and cognitive loss.

PSY5212HS Advanced Topics in Perception III: Functional MRI of the Human Visual System   Instructor: Bernhardt-Walther
In this hands-on class we will explore the functional properties of the human visual system using fMRI. We will cover the functional architecture of the visual system from the retina to high-level visual regions in the temporal lobe. Following introductions to the basics of fMRI and appropriate safety training, students will acquire their own fMRI data using functional localizers for retinotopic as well as higher-level visual regions. Students will learn how to analyze data, starting from pre-processing to regression analysis using general linear models. Visual regions of interest will be identified in the brain volume and on the cortical surface. Multivariate analysis techniques for decoding will be covered as time permits. Data analysis will be based on Freesurfer, Afni, Suma and Matlab, with heavy use of bash shell scripting. Basic familiarity with the Linux/Unix operating system is required.

PSY5303HS Cognitive Development: Probabilistic Models of Cognition   Instructor: Buchsbaum, D.
How can we understand intelligent behaviour as computation? This course will explore the probabilistic approach to understanding cognition, which models learning and reasoning as inference in complex probabilistic models. We will examine how a broad range of empirical phenomena, including intuitive physics, concept learning, causal reasoning, social cognition, and language understanding, can be modelled, and read and discuss research articles using this modelling approach. There are no formal prerequisites for this class. However, this is a graduate-level course, which will move relatively quickly and have technical content. Students should already be familiar with the basics of probability and programming.

PSY5311HS Advanced Topics in Development III: Perceptual/Cognitive and Motor Development   Instructor: Schmuckler
This class will explore ideas related to perceptual/cognitive development, motor development, and perceptual-motor integration. The class will be organized both topically (e.g., object perception, infant cognition, multisensory perception, object perception and language development, tool-use, perceptual-motor integration) as well as conceptually (e.g., the distinction between development and learning, the continuity of development, universal versus particularistic aspects of development).

PSY5402HS Personality: Fundamentals in Personality Psychology   Instructor: Fournier
This course is intended to introduce junior social-personality-abnormal graduate students in years MA1 or PhD1 to personality psychology – the scientific study of individual differences. Students will be introduced to core concepts in the field (e.g., traits, goals, and needs) and to the questions and controversies that currently surround them. Discussion topics will include personality architecture (structure and processes), personality development (stability and change), and the prediction of consequential outcomes (e.g., health, longevity, and happiness). Students will thus have the opportunity to develop their understanding of the field as well as to learn how personality psychologists think about and conduct research.

PSY5403S Social Cognition: Decision Making – Computational and Neural Approaches   Instructor: Hutcherson
How do we know what we like? Why do people sometimes make choices they regret? How can we help people make better decisions? This course will provide an introduction to major topics and debates in the field of neuroeconomics and decision neuroscience. Students will develop a basic familiarity with neural and computational models of valuation, decision making, reward learning, self-control, and social behaviour. Instruction will include critical analysis of both foundational and more recent papers, student presentations and discussion of ongoing debates in the field, as well as hands-on exploration of tools and techniques for computational model-fitting. Some basic knowledge of computer programming (or willingness to learn) will be helpful.